GMAT 2012| GMAT Notification | 2012 GMAT TEST|EXAM DATE|SYLLABUS|RESULTS | Cracking the GMAT, 2012

The GMAT exam is a standardized assessment, delivered in English, that helps business schools assess the qualifications of applicants for advanced study in business and management. GMAT™ scores are used by nearly 1,700 graduate management programs throughout the world, and more than 1,000 of these programs require GMAT scores from each applicant.

GMAT 2012 Test Format:-

The GMAT exam consists of three main parts, the Analytical Writing Assessment, the Quantitative section, and the Verbal section.

Analytical Writing Assessment:- The GMAT exam begins with the Analytical Writing Assessment (AWA). The AWA consists of two separate writing tasks—Analysis of an Issue and Analysis of an Argument. You are allowed 30 minutes to complete each one.

Quantitative Section:- Following an optional ten-minute break, you begin the Quantitative Section of the GMAT exam. This section contains 37 multiple-choice questions of two question types—Data Sufficiency and Problem Solving. You will be allowed a maximum of 75 minutes to complete the entire section.

Verbal Section:- After a second optional ten-minute break, you begin the Verbal Section of the GMAT exam. This section contains 41 multiple choice questions of three question types—Reading Comprehension, Critical Reasoning, and Sentence Correction. You are allowed a maximum of 75 minutes to complete the entire section.

Computer-Adaptive Format:- The Graduate Management Admission Test (GMAT) consists of four separately timed sections. Each of the first two sections consists of an analytical writing task; the remaining two sections (Quantitative and Verbal) consist of multiple-choice questions delivered in a computer-adaptive format. Questions in these sections are dynamically selected as you take the test; the multiple-choice questions will adjust to your ability level, and your test will be unique.

GMAT 2012 Scores:-

GMAT test takers receive four scores-

* Verbal
* Quantitative
* Analytical Writing Assessment (AWA)
* Total

An Official GMAT Score Report shows each of these scores; in cases of repeat testing, the score report will show all of the test taker’s GMAT scores for the past five years.

Verbal and Quantitative Scores :- The Verbal and Quantitative scores range from 0 to 60. Scores below 9 and above 44 for the Verbal section or below 7 and above 50 for the Quantitative section are rare. The Verbal and Quantitative scores measure different constructs and are not comparable to each other.

Analytical Writing Assessment Score:- The AWA score is an average of the two independent ratings for each section: Analysis of an Issue and Analysis of an Argument. These average scores can range from 0 to 6 in half point intervals.

Writing scores are computed separately from the scores for the multiple-choice sections of the test and have no effect on the Verbal, Quantitative, or Total scores.

Total GMAT Score:- Total GMAT scores range from 200 to 800. Two-thirds of test takers score between 400 and 600.

GMAT 2012 Pattern / Structure / Syllabus:-

The GMAT consists of three main parts—the Analytical Writing Assessment, the Quantitative section, and the Verbal section

GMAT Analytical Writing Assessment (AWA):-

The Analytical Writing Assessment (AWA) of the GMAT is designed as a direct measure of your ability to think critically and to communicate your ideas.

The AWA consists of two 30-minute writing tasks—Analysis of an Issue and Analysis of an Argument.

The issues and arguments presented on the test concern topics of general interest related to business or a variety of other subjects. A specific knowledge of the essay topic is not necessary; only your capacity to write analytically is assessed.

GMAT Quantitative Section:-

The Quantitative section of the GMATmeasures the ability to reason quantitatively, solve quantitative problems, and interpret graphic data.

Problem-Solving and Data-Sufficiency questions are intermingled throughout the section. Both types of questions require knowledge of:

* arithmetic,
* elementary algebra, and
* commonly known concepts of geometry.

Problem-Solving Questions

Problem-Solving questions are designed to test:

* basic mathematical skills,
* understanding of elementary mathematical concepts, and
* the ability to reason quantitatively and solve quantitative problems.

Data-Sufficiency Questions

Data-Sufficiency questions are designed to measure your ability to:

* analyze a quantitative problem,
* recognize which information is relevant, and
* determine at what point there is sufficient information to solve a problem.

GMAT Verbal Section:-

Three types of multiple-choice questions are used in the Verbal section of the GMAT exam—Reading Comprehension, Critical Reasoning, and Sentence Correction.

The Verbal section of the GMAT exam measures your ability to:

* read and comprehend written material,
* reason and evaluate arguments, and
* correct written material to conform to standard written English.

Reading Comprehension Questions:- Reading Comprehension passages are up to 350 words long. Topics contain material from the social sciences, physical or biological sciences, and business-related areas (marketing, economics, human resource management, etc.).

Critical Reasoning Questions:- Critical Reasoning questions are designed to test the reasoning skills involved in making arguments, evaluating arguments, and formulating or evaluating a plan of action. Questions are based on materials from a variety of sources. No familiarity with the specific subject matter is needed.

Sentence Correction Questions:- Sentence Correction questions ask you which of the five choices best expresses an idea or relationship. The questions will require you to be familiar with the stylistic conventions and grammatical rules of standard written English. You must also demonstrate your ability to improve incorrect or ineffective expressions.







Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,